, published in the Salt Lake Tribune, December 20, 2016.

, published in the Los Angeles Times, August 25, 2016.

Rosamond Richardson is an author, journalist, essayist and walker who is at her happiest wandering about in wild places. Author of several books about things natural, including the international bestseller Country Wisdom, she writes for The Countryman and contributes regularly to Countryside NFU magazine. She has a special interest in our relationship with wild flowers and trees, their beauty and the roles they have played in our cultural and imaginative lives for centuries. Her current project Natural Histories of Wild Flowers and Trees tells their many fascinating and diverse stories. Rosamond writes the monthly column ‘Reflections’ for BirdWatching magazine. These pieces (with more) will be collected into a book (working title Waiting for the Albino Dunnock) based on encounters with the mystery and diversity of birds, their relationship to their habitats, the natural world around them, and to us.

Michelle Remblance lives in, and enjoys exploring, Norfolk. Her love for nature is expressed in her writing, and she has recently completed a novel re-writing The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in an attempt to try and understand why anyone would shoot an albatross. After researching hundreds of possible explanations that have spanned more than two hundred years, she has reached her own unique conclusions about this famous literary example of bird cruelty, and she can now turn her attention to Cock Robin.

Katrina Porteous is a poet, historian and broadcaster, much of whose work involves a detailed and loving celebration of the people, landscapes and wildlife of the Northumbrian coast where she lives. She has written extensively about local inshore fishing traditions, and often works in collaboration with artists and musicians, including painter James Dodds (Longshore Drift) and piper Chris Ormston (The Wund an’ the Wetter). Her long poems for BBC radio with producer Julian May include Dunstanburgh, The Refuge Box, and – with electronic composer Peter Zinovieff – Horse and Edge. Her most recent poetry collection is Two Countries (Bloodaxe, 2014).

, WAMC Northeast Public Radio, published August 23, 2016.

Charles Bennett is a highly regarded, prize-winning poet whose work has been published to wide acclaim in the UK, Europe and America. He was born in the North West of England and was a mature student in the 1980s at London University and the University of Massachusetts, where he was mentored by Nobel Laureate Joseph Brodsky. Following the completion of a doctorate on the structure of meaning in Seamus Heaney’s sequences, he taught English and Drama for several years before becoming the first Director of Ledbury Poetry Festival, which he established and ran for a number of highly-successful years before stepping down to become an academic. He is currently Reader in Poetry at the University of Northampton where he leads the BA in Creative Writing. His engaging second full-length collection, How to Make a Woman Out of Water, appeared with Enitharmon in 2007. His poems have been reviewed by Frieda Hughes in The Times and have featured in over 150 poetry magazines including the Times Literary Supplement.

, published August 8, 2016, Montana Public Radio.

Dr Mark Avery worked for the RSPB for twenty-five years – first as a scientist and for the latter half of that time as the Society’s Conservation Director. He is now a freelance writer and environmental commentator. His latest book, Fighting for Birds: 25 years in nature conservation, is published in August 2012 by Pelagic Publishing. He writes a daily blog on UK nature conservation matters at .

, published July 19, 2016, by Los Angeles Review of Books.

Kim Atkinson is an artist with a particular interest in birds, plants, insects and interactions of species within habitats. She uses a variety of media including printmaking and painting, her studio work usually being developed from drawings of subjects and experiences of nature in her garden, on the cliffs near her home, and at times under water while snorkelling. Her art education was both in painting and later in natural history illustration, resulting in an MA at the Royal College of Art. She has participated in Artists for Nature Foundation projects around the world, and she regularly exhibits work at the , of which she is a member. Her work also appears in several anthologies of Wildlife Art, most recently Wildlife in Printmaking (Langford Press, 2011). From 2008 to 2010 she collaborated with Noëlle Griffiths to make the art book Bird Song in which the artists made a visual and written response to the soundscapes of two very different landscapes in North Wales. This and other work can be viewed at .

Brett Westwood has been presenting and producing Radio 4 programmes for over fifteen years at the BBC Natural History Unit. These include Living World, Saving Species, Nature and World on the Move. He is the UK natural history consultant for Springwatch and Autumnwatch and an accomplished field naturalist with particular interests in birds, plants and insects. He writes the monthly accounts of natural history for BBC Wildlife magazine.

, published April, 2016, by Mercer University Press.

, Back of Beyond Books, Moab, UT.

Mike Rands is Executive Director of the CCI. After an early career as a research ecologist studying farmland wildlife populations in the UK, he developed and directed a programme of multidisciplinary conservation projects in over 100 countries for an international conservation organisation (ICBP). In 1996 Mike was appointed Chief Executive of the global conservation partnership, BirdLife International, before joining CCI as its first Director in 2009.


Hi Fjordis. I would like to ask Fjordman if he knows. Breivik stated in court that 35/37 doctors did not find any symptom in ABB. Can Fjordman verify this fact?

Katrina Porteous is a poet, historian and broadcaster, much of whose work involves a detailed and loving celebration of the people, landscapes and wildlife of the Northumbrian coast where she lives. She has written extensively about local inshore fishing traditions, and often works in collaboration with artists and musicians, including painter James Dodds (Longshore Drift) and piper Chris Ormston (The Wund an’ the Wetter). Her long poems for BBC radio with producer Julian May include Dunstanburgh, The Refuge Box, and – with electronic composer Peter Zinovieff – Horse and Edge. Her most recent poetry collection is Two Countries (Bloodaxe, 2014).

English Literature: Bacon: As an Essayist

Martin Rees is a cosmologist and space scientist. He is based in Cambridge, where he has been Director of the Institute of Astronomy, a Research Professor, and, until recently, Master of Trinity College. He was President of the Royal Society during 2005–2010, and in 2005 was appointed to the House of Lords. He lectures, writes and broadcasts widely for general audiences. His books include Before the Beginning, Our Final Century?, Just Six Numbers, Our Cosmic Habitat, Gravity’s Fatal Attraction, and From Here to Infinity: Scientific Horizons, an expanded version of his BBC Reith Lectures. Ever since Our Final Century? was published, he has been concerned with the threats stemming from humanity’s ever-heavier ‘footprint’ on the global environment, and with the runaway consequences of ever more powerful technologies. These concerns led him to join with colleagues in setting up a Centre for the Study of Existential Risks (CSER). This is based in Cambridge and has a strong international advisory board.